today is Nov 28, 2021

Ever since his parents dragged me on skis behind them as a toddler, Grant Gunderson has been obsessed with skiing. Over the years that obsession grew, and soon he was reading every ski publication he could get his hands on, cover to cover, numerous times.

“In college I was fortunate to score a coveted internship at Powder magazine despite being an engineering major (I guess they liked the pics I sent). That internship helped me jump start a career crisscrossing the globe, chasing snow with some of the world’s best athletes.”

Fast forward the better part of two decades, he says he’s fortunate to have never formally used his engineering degree, and instead has been able to continue to produce images for the likes of Powder, NatGeo, IKON pass and others.

“Today, if I’m not away chasing snow (luckily nearby Mt. Baker gets a ton of snow), you can find me at home in Bellingham, WA riding bikes, or teaching my 3 year old son to ski.”

Below is what Grant considers his Top 5 photographs of his career thus far.

Zack Giffin, Paul Kimbraugh, Matt Steinman, Mt. Baker, Washington

Photo Credit: Grant Gunderson

Zack Giffin, Paul Kimbraugh, Matt Steinman, Mt. Baker, Washington

The Shuksan arm at Mt. Baker is one of the most scenic places in the world to ski tour, and it also happens to have some pretty phenomenal skiing too. I am very lucky to get to call it my home area. The day I shot this image, it was puking snow all day. Zack Giffin and I ended up catching last chair, up and ran into a couple patroller friends, Matt Stienman and Paul Kimbrough and we decided to break the trail out the arm in the storm. As we got to the top, the storm paused for a minute, I shot this frame and we skied down. By the time we got to the bottom it was puking snow again.

Josh Daiek, Rutherford Glacier, British Columbia

Photo Credit: Grant Gunderson

Josh Daiek, Rutherford Glacier, British Columbia

Josh Daiek and I where having a bit of an uneventful day sled skiing in Pemberton, B.C. when Josh decided to tee up on the edge of the Ice cap. In the years since, I always look to see if it's doable anytime I’m in the area, but the glacier has receded to the point that I’m not sure if it will be good to go again, or at least on this scale.

Tanner Rainville, Ahmet Dadali, Shimamaki Snowcats, Japan

Photo Credit: Grant Gunderson

Tanner Rainville, Ahmet Dadali, Shimamaki Snowcats, Japan

This image was shot exactly four weeks after I broke my ankle in numerous places in an avalanche at Mt. Baker. The snow that day skiing with Tanner Rainville and Ahmet Dadali Shimamaki Snowcats, on Hokkaido was so good that I actually forgot I was skiing on a still badly broken ankle.

Dane Tudor, Park City Powder Cats, Utah

Photo Credit: Grant Gunderson

Dane Tudor, Park City Powder Cats, Utah

In my years as a photographer, I've learned there are two key ingredients to creating a good image in addition to working with great skiers:  Light and Anticipation. Without both you are just relying on luck. So, anytime I'm out, I'm always trying to anticipate what the light is going to and how the skier is going to interact with it. For this image of Dane Tudor, I did my best to anticipate where I thought he would end up in relation to the sun, and with a little bit of luck, it all lined up for his shadow to fill the space in the foreground of the image.

Dana Flahr, Mt Baker, Washington

Photo Credit: Grant Gunderson

Dana Flahr, Mt Baker, Washington

The Mt. Baker road gap is a rite of passage for any visiting pro skier. I've shot it more times than I can count, but this image of Dana Flahr throwing a front flip over it at night, always stands out to me.

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