today is Nov 28, 2021

Ian Fohrman began his photography career early – growing up, his dad’s old metal-body Nikomat 35m hung from his shoulder on its aging leather strap like an extra appendage. He consistently haunted our school’s darkroom at odd hours. On the mountain, Ian often ditched race training to go lap the terrain park or find deeper turns in the old growth trees on the other side of the mountain. He was too fun-loving, free-thinking and distractible to become a serious ski racer – plus, he was too beautiful of a skier.

In 2004, Ian began his career at Powder as a contributing writer. He has since found ways to make his creativity further support his life and adventures. He has spent the last 16 years helping build The Public Works, a unique Denver-based creative agency founded in 2005 by snowboard industry legends Mike Arzt and Frank Phillips, into a recognizable brand, known for their creative work ranging from unique industrial design to award winning production.

Ian’s work has brought him to the far regions of every continent besides Antarctica. He has written, shot, and directed award winning content for some of the biggest brands in the world (from Redbull to Airstream). His photos have appeared everywhere from the cover of the Wall Street Journal to international billboards and graced the pages of nearly every major outdoor publication. Ian’s most cherished moments, and most inspired work, comes when he’s in challenging circumstances – Skiing the Grand Teton or holding his breath to get a shot under the Indian Ocean.

Personally, I’ve always loved Ian’s images because they offer a glimpse into the way he sees the world, which is truly a gift in every frame. Though he possesses great technical skill, it’s his mindfulness that sets him apart as a photographer. — Tess Weaver

George Rodney and Kyle Taylor. Cormayeur, Italy

Photo Credit: Ian Fohrman

George Rodney and Kyle Taylor. Cormayeur, Italy

George Rodney with Kyle Taylor taking it all in. We were living in an abandoned house in Courmayeur with 6 dudes bumming it after the Freeride tour. I was using one t-shirt as my pillowcase and another as my towel as there wasn’t a single towel in the entire house. We didn’t have any guide so we were just exploring and trying not to die in the massive terrain. Each night we’d roll back into town around dark, having skied our faces off all day. We’d stroll down cobblestone streets in our ski boots, skis on our shoulders, the shop windows beginning to glow yellow. A vivacious Italian woman would welcome us into the homey little pub we had adopted and we’d load up on pizza and Moretti beers. Then we’d wake up, drink about five of the best cappuccinos you’ve ever had, and do it all again.

Weminuche Wilderness, Colorado

Photo Credit: Ian Fohrman

Weminuche Wilderness, Colorado

Barely more than 24 hours after we tunneled up an impossibly steep climb in deep snow and made consequential focus demanding turns down the face of Pigeon Peak, we walked the empty train tracks along the Animas river.

We weathered a powerful storm of whirling graupel and thundersnow and long sleepless night at 12,200'. We climbed two peaks in one of the most remote places in Colorado, and witnessed Mother Nature at her most powerful. After a successful peak day and a brutal hike out on the scarce Pigeon Creek "trail", we found ourselves waiting for a usually punctual train for 2 hours.

We surveyed all possibilities (including settling in and starting our post zombie apocalypse society in our remote outpost of Needleton) and finally decided to start the 12 mile walk South toward Durango. Luckily a railway worker showed up in a small tractor car, let us know about the rockfall that damaged the tracks and agreed to give us and our gear a lift to the slide.

We ended up concluding our epic adventure riding the tracks in an open railway repair car winding along the stunning cliffs high above the Animas.where we slid an entire peak on our first ski cut, experienced a crazy thunder and lightning snow storm while camping at 11,900’, my boots froze and took 40 minutes to get on, and then the train didn’t show up because the tracks got washed out.

Whit Boucher. Pyramid Peak, Colorado

Photo Credit: Ian Fohrman

Whit Boucher. Pyramid Peak, Colorado

Pyramid has always loomed large in my mountain consciousness. It is one of the most aesthetic, magnetic, and dangerous of the Colorado 14,000’ peaks. Chris Landry and Michael Kennedy pioneered it in 1978 and in 2006 Chris Davenport, Neal Beidleman, and Ted Mahon skied this line for the first time since.

Davenport said of the line, “I have been a skier my entire life, and have had the incredible privilege of skiing many great mountain ranges all over the world. With that said, I can honestly claim that today was one of the best runs of my life. This is a run that I will carry with me for the rest of my life, something that I will always be extremely proud of. That face is now part of my soul, and I couldn’t be happier about it!” We echo those sentiments.

At this moment Whit Boucher and I had been moving for around 5 hours. After a snowmobile approach, we skinned in silence under a blazing milky way for hours. We made an early navigation error and had to retrace our steps - luckily the steps were up a 1000’ couloir and we were rewarded for our sins with an extra 1000’ of powder skiing in the deep purple pre-dawn glow. Directly above Whit in this photo is the infamous Landry line. We skied in beautiful conditions after an airy climb up the exposed route right of frame.

Dave Wade. Grand Teton, Wyoming

Photo Credit: Ian Fohrman

Dave Wade. Grand Teton, Wyoming

Dave and I met during an abysmal snow year in Valdez, AK. I was on assignment from Powder Magazine and ESPN to cover the revival of the World Extremes but everything was going to sh#$ because the entire state was a frozen ocean. Dave was conducting impromptu guide classes in the parking lot on Thompson pass. I refreshed my crevasse rescue skills and we immediately hit it off. We did some single-pitch ice climbing together and vowed to someday do something cool in the Tetons together. Years later, after one failed attempt on the Grand, we made it happen. Dave shot me a text to let me know that conditions were in and I made a mad dash from Mt. Hood summer camp. The next night we were walking under the glowing Milky Way in the moon shadow of one of the most iconic peaks in North America. Dave is an amazing partner and was an absolute joy to climb and ski with.

There was one team ahead of us in the Ford Stettner kicking ice chunks down on us. We spent a good hour cursing their names and Dave was ready to give them a piece of his mind when we got to the summit. When we ended up catching them right at the summit top -out and it turned out to be the captain of a ship that I lived on in a Fjord in Northern Norway. We all enjoyed an hour of sunny, cold, windless time and the summit and then teamed up on the rappels out as swirling clouds and graupel descended on us.

Chris Davenport. Portillo, Chile

Photo Credit: Ian Fohrman

Chris Davenport. Portillo, Chile

I’ve been making the pilgrimage to this little piece of South American paradise for a decade and a half. Nestled on a lake, under the shadow of the tallest mountain on the continent (Aconcagua 22,841′), on the dividing line between Chile and Argentina, Portillo sits as a monument to sliding on snow.

I’ve seen all the moods of the mountain here, from the infamously powerful winds of the Andes to the equally powerful sun. I’ve weathered country closing storms, earthquakes, dry spells articulating the effects of climate change, and hungover drives down one of the windiest roads on the continent. I’ve skied the famed SuperC Couloir in pow, perfect corn, and heinous wind-board. I’ve shot photos of athletes jumping out of the helicopter into the pool, training gates, and ski modeling their hearts out in every nook and cranny of this place. We’ve shut down the basement discoteca, racked up the hobbs hours with Warren Miller Entertainment, and post holed for hours. Every memory here is truly made special by the beautiful cast of characters that have been drawn to this mecca.

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